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permanent normal trade relations to russia. this past august russia joined the world trade organization, giving its members full access to russia's rapidly growing market. reduce tariffs, and ensure transparency when implementing trade measures. however, while foreign competitors are currently benefiting, the u.s. will not receive any of these benefits until congress authorizes the president to grant russia permanent normal trade relations. simply put, american companies, workers, and farmers are being put at a competitive disadvantage. last year my home state of michigan exported $225 million worth of goods to russia. despite many of its best products facing tough competition from foreign competitors. with this agreement in place, farmers and producers in my district will be assured of more predictable market access for the crops and arkansas urel goods, while manufacturers will enjoy reduced tariff rates for michigan-made vehicles and equipment. as the world trade organization member, russia has agreed to comply with the rule of law. though these reforms won't happen overnight, russia
! >> the biggest geopolitical threat facing america you said russia. not al qaeda, you said russia. and the 1980s are calling to ask for their foreign policy back. (laughter and applause). >> jon: well, that was a little hackie. i mean that was -- that was a it will roasty. i wouldn't (bleep) your foreign policy with margaret thatcher's (bleep), come on! hickory dickory dock, your geopolitical understanding can suck my -- (laughter) sorry. that's -- no, please don't because then i'll do it again some night. (laughter) so the president had a good night. must have felt pretty confident because he was letting his professor or y'all side shine through. especially when it came to one country. >> we've created partnerships throughout the region to deal with extremism. in somalia, in yemen, in pakistan. >> jon: what? really? (laughter) pah-kee-stahn? really? suddenly you're a guy who's desperate to prove you once roomed with a foreign exchange student? (laughter) look, this is america, we don't use the pronunciation locally. we don't say may-hee-co or frahnce. mexico, france. pakistan. (laughter) all in
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
is referring to russia, that the great bear will attack israel but also have other allies. iran will be one of those. bible describes there is going to be so much bloodshed that the blood will rise as high as the horses bridle. many people believe there is a rapture, that jesus will appear in the clouds that christians from all over the world will be taken up into the heavens. then there will be seven year period. at the end of the seven years, the battle of armageddon and jesus will come back and he will stand upon the mounted of olives. after that, thousand year reign of christ. >> reporter: we'll be there to capture the second coming. >> any time people can go on our website and when the end comes. day star will be there. >> some people say it's going to happen on this date and this is how it is going to happen. >> and prediction who will win the battle of good and evil? >> i do believe good is going to win. not because i'm hopeful but history has shown this. >> bill: nobody knows how the end will come while doomsday believers have made an industry out of scaring people with predictions.
. it scares me sometimes. >> last time we spoke you said you were investing in russia. you still are? >> i'm looking for investments in russia. i don't have anything there yet. it's not that easy for me to find things in russia. partly because i'm a little lazedy these days. i don't work as hard as i used to. >> oh. okay. >> all right. so -- >> maybe -- >> let's put politics aside. what are you doing? tell me about your portfolio. let's get right down to it. what do you like, what are you long, what are you short? >> i'm, today, tomorrow -- today here, tomorrow there -- i'm going to short more bonds, more u.s. government bonds. i'm going to buy more commodities, buy metals, base metals and precious metals. looks to me like the money printing is going to run amok now. and the spending is going to run amok now. again, larry, i'm not saying this is good for the world, it's not good for anybody. this is what's going to go on. i have to invest based on what's happening, not on what i would like. >> mr. rodgers, rick santelli here. what about europe? i don't disagree with your notion you want to
? palestinians may soon have an answer. labs in russia, france and switzerland will conduct separate tests of bone samples taken today. muslim clerics gave permission to open his grave. it was a delicate process kept out of sight. >> it was important for the palestinians to emphasize that no foreign hands touched the remains of yasser arafat, only the palestinians touched him. a matter of honor. the last time arafat was seen in public he flew to a paris hospital age 75 and sick. three weeks later he was dead. why? his wife refused an autopsy. rumors flew, aids murdered, poisoned, that's what many palestinians believed. >> all the circumstantial evidence, all the political evidence indicate only one direction, which is mr. sharon. >> reporter: israel denies it. there was no real evidence he had been killed, until this year. the investigation was triggered by swiss technicians working with al jazeera tv. they examined arafat's toothbrush and hat and found traces of radioactive polonium 210. ten times more toxic than cyanide. the question now is, will they find it on his bones? >> the likelih
. revelations 20 about the balance of gog and mahgog g referring to russia that the great bear will attack israel but will have other allies, iran will be one of those. the bible describes there is going to be so much bloodshed that the blood will rice as high as the horse's bridle. many people believe that there is a rapture that jesus will appear in the clouds and that the christians from all over the world will be taken up into the heavens and then there will be a seven year period, at the end of that seven year the battle of armageddon, jesus will come back and he will stand upon the mount of olive, after that the thousand year reign of christ over the earth. we have a live 24 hour camera feed any time day or night people can go on our website, when the end comes, day star will be there. >> some say it is going to happen on this date and this is how. the text is not that detailed. >> most welcome prediction about who will win the balance of good and evil. >> i believe that good is going to win that is not because i'm hopeful, but because history has shown us. >>> no one knows if or how
revelation 20 about the battle of dog and magog. he is referring to russia that the great baear will attack israel but will also have oral lies. iran will be one of those. the bible describes that there is going to be so much bloodshed that the blood will rise as high as the horse's bridal. many people believe that there is a retcher that jesus will appear in the clouds and christians from all over the world will be taken up into the heavens and then there will be a 7 year period called the tribl layings period -- tribulation p. after that 7 years jesus will come back and stand upon the mount of olives and after that the thousand year reign of christ on the earth. >> lamb says daystar will be there to capture the second coming. >> we have a live 24-hour camera feed that any time day or night people can go on our web site when the end comes daystar will be there. >> some people will say we are going to have it on this date and this is how it's going to happen. >> you make an unscholarly yet most welcome prediction about who will win the battle of good and evil. >> i do believe that good is g
. experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains also looking for a possible pulonium concentration. the samples will be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france, and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yassir arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says. because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him, as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course, i am against it, he says. it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused israel of being behind any poisoning of arafat. a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it's not clear if pelonium can be traced eight years after the palestinian leader's death. but if heightened levels are found, the next
from the beginning. i thought he may have voted the same way barack did. he went from labeling russia, which he recently called the soviet union, labeling russia are most significant geopolitical foe -- let me tell you something, he also was opposed to the new start treaty which every single solitary former republican secretary of state, republican national security adviser, republican secretary of defense was for. he was against it. he said he would have never supported it. all of a sudden -- i tell you. it is amazing. we can work with russia, we can be very close with russia. [laughter] he went from harshly criticizing us to saying we will and we will turn over for responsibility to the afghan military at the end of 2014. [applause] he went from saying we should never have set a timetable, he would not do that. i had a debate, too, with ryan. [applause] in my day, he was talking about more troops in the east, more americans would be there -- we should not have set a date. then along comes romney -- my generation has gone on the wings of a snow white dove, preaching -- preaching love
to go to -- you got to russia, libya. twenty-three countries. egypt and honduras and the philippines. the leaders of these countries must get that they are doing something wrong. >> they did it easier than in north america. the people who brought in the rule of law and property rights into the united states, the 18th and 19th century, you can't remember that. in the case of these guys, they see that they are poor relative to your wealth. it's easy for them to sycamore is the difference? they are constantly looking so they can recognize mh faster. we did not realize the fact it you can determine that a piece of land went from there to year, you can also do it with a movie script. you can also do it with an idea, an invention. and certainly. all of a sudden we started seeing that peopleust the paper. on top of that, you build a stock market and all that leverage. get you into some kind of trouble, but without which you wouldot have gotten where you are today. john: property rights give us the power to prosper. thank you. we will be right back. ♪ john: all over america there are parks
. >> john: you grew up in russia. >> grew up in russia. didn't have the hostess. came here. >> john: you eat only healthy food. >> that's right. other russian flavors hostess doesn't make. so i've steered clear. and my understanding is nobody really -- i don't really understand, nobody still eats hostess as a practice of -- if we want baked goods we buy hostess. am i wrong? >> john: no one eats hostess caifntle. >> they do eat the coast es cakes but it is not seen as a delicious dessert. >> john: it is. twinkies have a shelf life of seven years because they have so many preservatives in them. i want to feed someone nothing but twinkies the last ten years of their life and see how long it takes their body to decompose when they die. between twinkies and ho hos which dick morris is a fan and chock codials, i don't know if they make those anymore but the cupcakes are still huge. hostess sells wonder bread so maybe you don't have kids -- >> don't have kids. >> john: children still love this crap. >> childre
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
korea, north korea, russia and japan all have leadership succession or elections during that year. it inevitably makes the top leaders focused inward on leadership issues, very unwilling to appear to be in any way weak abroad and so forth. 2013 is the opposite. you would expect the new leaders knowing they have to deal with each other for years to come potentially have a more positive agenda looking forward. how do we build something that's not going to impose high costs is and have few benefits? every one of those leaders has enormous domestic problems that they have to confront, and they want some more space to pursue that. so i think there's an underlying, you know, the kind of underlying tectonic plates are moving at a somewhat different direction in 2013. obviously, specific events can throw that out of whack, and if you look at the details, they're pretty tough. on xi personally, you know, he has evinced some, you know, he has some exposure to the u.s., he seems to enjoy being here when he's been here, he has good relations with vice president biden and so forth. he seems to
by all places russia. here's "the wall street journal's" translation of it. "the electoral system are contradictory archaic and moreover done meet the democratic principles that the united states claims are fundamental to its foreign and domestic policy." i hate to say, it but moscow has a point. on the one hand, we have one thing the russians don't, actual free elections. this election season we've seen attempts to shorten the early voting period to further one party's chances of victory. our ballots can be as long as a dozen pages. in some places they're paper ballots and in some they're electronic. and election day always falls on a tuesday, a working day. every four years we see the chaos of american elections, but nothing changes. this week international election observers were banned from nine states. some of these men and women were threatened with arrest. maybe we should start learning from election officials from abroad, not trying to throw them into jail. >>> up next, big data in the presidential election. why what you eat and what music you listen to has everything to d
in the russians had behaved, i don't think we can give up on russia because they do know the syrian military there in getting bashar al-assad out of the country is not going to solve all the problems. if he leaves, particularly if he were to leave tomorrow, let's say, you would have fragmentation in syria for both sides this is an existential struggle. and alawite dominated army is not going to give up because bashar gave up. and the competition is not going to lay down their arms because bashar less. so i think we very much, if there's going to be any hope for resolution that keeps syria impact for the time being we need the russians, and we need putin, and we need them to recognize that their nihilistic attitude right now doesn't play well. and i would suggest that a number of countries might do better by putting pressure on russia rather than excoriating the united states. i do believe in military intervention. i think we could very well find ourselves backing one side and then only to find that we're incapable of stopping them from occurring the other side if they defeat them. we've seen
trying to broker a truce in gaza. that includes the u.n., russia, the eu and the united states. >>> and this story here developing every minute. stay with cnn, of course, and cnn.com for updates throughout the morning and throughout the day here on cnn. >>> now to the latest on the investigation into benghazi. who knew what and when? the spokesman for the director of national intelligence says the intelligence community, not the white house, state department or the justice department made substantive changes to talking points given to government officials. the obama administration especially u.n. ambassador susan rice has taken a lot of heat over those talking points. rice used them as a basis for comments she made on sunday talk shows five days after the deadly attack. >>> indianapolis detectives say recent explosion at an area subdivision was no accident. this homicide investigation now is under way. two people were killed. seven others injured. back on november 10th in this blast that just leveled -- look at these pictures -- leveled several homes, damaged more than 30 other
to end up like russia. there are thousands of family in cincinnati that have led from socialism. if we have obama as president socialism will be in the united states. host: less of a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. -- let's look at a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. all the candidates have been crisscrossing ohio. the other battleground states colorado, iowa, and now wisconsin. minnesota is in play. a romney in pennsylvania. the states of getting the most attention since the party conventions. they have been traveling to a total of 10 states. later this afternoon we will have live coverage of bombing donald. he will be joined by two of the romney sons. they are in virginia. good afternoon. caller: hello. i voted for obama because i am highly impressed with his leadership and the leadership he has shown throughout his administration. i am also impressed with his vice-president mr. joe biden. they work together as a team. we need to finish what we started. i also enjoyed listening to mr. biden's comment today about mitt romney. he said mitt romn
.p. and they also have, b.p. has a big deal going with russia right now too, start drilling in antarctica. i think they need to put a stop to that, or at least some regulation and more control on it. and that's my comment. host: don, thanks for the call from new york this morning. here's a chart from the "new york times," talking about the money b.p. has set aside and spent to date to cover the fall out from the 2010 spill. b.p. has set aside about $42 billion to cover cover costs related to the accident. spent about $36.3 billion to date, that includes the $4.5 billion of fines and penalties levied by the government as part of thursday's settlement. about $7.8 billion proposed settlement with other claimments, $9 billion paid out to resolve claims by individuals, businesses and government enities, and $14 billion in operational response and clean up cost. we'll go to dean from grantsburg, wisconsin on the democratic line. dean, thanks for the call. caller: hi. host: go ahead. caller: thanks for taking my call. i just want to say if your guy's program wasn't so good we wouldn't be able to ask such
, switzerland and russia will take samples to test for possible poisoning. mr. arafat's body will then be reburied in the west bank. palestinian officials hope the test will clear up questions over whether arafat's death in 2004 was the result of poi zonk by a radioactive substance. >>> let's get back to the middle east now. there is a cease-fire in place. that is good for now. but the violence could easily spark up again without a long-term solution. joining me now, a former palestinian negotiator and adviser for palestinian president mahmoud abbas. now she is at the institute for middle east understanding. good morning to you what. do you see is the most important issue for palestinians? >> good morning. well, i think if we're going to be honest and move forward, then we're going to have to begin to address israel's 45-year military occupation, and in particular, it's ongoing siege and blockade of the gaza strip. that's with respect to gaza. but in terms of the bigger picture, it's not just a question of gaza, but also a question of israel finally ending its military rule o
. they did it with me first and then the israeli embassy in russia's refusal, the chinese refusal. it was an interesting experience . thank you pay much for inviting me. >> governor sununu. >> like to just add something to with the speaker has just pointed out. the climate really was different at that time. this is not a big piece of legislation we were very hard on on a bipartisan atheist. we passed the clean air bill, which had been languishing for over a decade. we passed an americans with disabilities, which is extremely difficult. we passed the civil rights bill. said there was a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as representatives obey pointed out later on, that is manifested in what was brilliant on precedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing the invasion to kuwait and tried to pull together a unified respect you. it was an accidental. i really believe we work awfully hard in order to maintain. the keyword was the fact that tom foley and president bush have been members of congress to get there. they had developed a personal relation
that russia was our number one geopolitical enemy? it's all water under the bridge now. i do wonder, though, did any defining moment really change your mind or was your mind made up on day one? talk back today. election 2012, what was your defining moment? facebook.com/carolcnn. your responses later this hour. >>> a presidential election too close to call, a battleground state mired in voting problems and controversy. sound familiar? sure does in florida. those haunting memories of of that 2000 debacle are still painfully fresh and now a new crop of concerns are hanging over the elections there. ali velshi is keeping a close eye on the problems. he joins us from cnn's vote watch desk. it was ugly this weekend in florida. >> can you imagine that we're having this conversation about voting problems in florida? i guess it wouldn't be a batt battle -- without a battle in florida. one of third of the state's registered democrats do their voting in three counties. this is what the early voting lines looked like in miami yesterday. >> i've been waiting here since 12:30 to pick up an absentee ballo
! wow. i've he never seen anything other than in soviet russia to see this kind -- >> jim, jim -- >> what? david? >> is it too early to buy groupon? >> i've been debating that, and zynga. >> what is amazing, it wasn't that long ago, this company came public, marketed as a great growth stock. as melissa just said, there is no growth anywhere. it takes you back to a number of the ipos we know quite well, zynga, groupon, facebook to an extent, linkedin, this group never should have been public. before it went public they did that final round, raised $900 million and google was willing to pay them $6 billion for that company but they wouldn't pay it now. >> wow, wow. >> unbelievable. josh brown, frequent guest on "the halftime" today said they have destroyed 10 billion of a $12 billion original cap. this ipo was a war crime. >> a war crime? >> invokes nuremberg. >> have you mentioned, evercore going to $2 price target -- >> he starts by saying we missed our revenue expectations by meeting our operating profitability? wow. meeting what? meeting what? fiscal cliff. >> here on "squawk
with president karzai of afghanistan, prime min stir in italy, king ab dull la ii, and president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that, i'll take your questions. >> jay, thanks. a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering, one specific and them a bigger picture one. general al help, learning more about questions about him, and the pentagon investigation, alleged behavior. does the president have faith that general can continue to lead the war in afghanistan during this critical period of time while under investigation? >> i can tell you that the president thinks very highly of general allen and his service to the country as well as the job he's done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense, the president put on hold general allen's nomination as supreme allied commander of europe pending the investigation of general allen's conduct by the department of defense ig. the president remains focused on fully supporting our troops and partners in afghanistan that general allen led so ably for over a year. the president nominated general dunfo
buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge that we need to face. and the solution is not a military solution. it's a smart one. >> we have to wrap up soon. to get the conference back on schedule. two more comments here and back there to get them in. >> thank you very much. [inaudible] i'm the australia commissioner in australia. i'm afraid on -- [inaudible] i wante
. the united states if, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p-5 plus one and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. both sides have fumbled the fleeting opportunities to reduce the risk of a nuclear armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable. meaning that iran has a scientific, technical, and industrial capacity eventually to produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. the intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran would require several months to aware enough fissile material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverible nuclear weapon. secretary of decommon sense panetta recently estimated it would take two to three years to do so. the latest report bhaced on its ongoing inspections of iran's nuclear facilities, particularly
already have a go. then this could be the job for you. >> reporter: while russia today carries a typical quote, the whole process of american elections is fundamentally anti-democratic. in rural kenya a bull fight, one named obama, the other romney. but make no mistake, many the world over see this election as hugely important to them. >> america is the powerhouse of the world, and the sooner that america is about thor the sooner the world is better. >> i'd love to see growth pick up in the u.s. more than anything because europe has stalled. >> reporter: does this really affect business on day to day internationally. >> this is very seriously importantly indeed, not just for business, but for the markets and it's all about confidence. it doesn't even matter who wins. it's making sure we get a clear decisive decision one way or the other. >> reporter: and on security many see the american stance as directly affecting them. >> the u.s. with a traditional role one of the policemen in the world is something that might have to be rethought, particularly a question of whether or not it's affor
, the british empire, the u.s. and russia, and how these three played geopolitically behind the scenes. >> when i saw the title of this, it makes me think of howard. i know you have done a lot of research. how important, a geeky history question, but how important was that back to forming the guts of what you have done? it's probably the most pom lar and influential a.m. tern tiff history of the united states ever written. >> it's a different kind of book than howard's book. we are both friends with howard and he was very excite d about this project. we miss him and we're building on him but in a different way. howard was talking about social forceses have shaped america. he's talk iing about domestic issues more. what we're talking about is, first of all, the american empire and, secondly, the rise of the national security state. so in some ways howard's book and our book are perfect complements, the two sides that tell the entire story together. >> i'm wondering if, you know, one of the points of this is to say u.s. presidents especially in wartime have trampled on the constitution and intern
in early 1945. the war is winding down. russia has beaten back germany and crippled them in stalin grad, places like that. what long-term effect, shor short-term effect, did roosevelt's weakness/illness in it dealing with stalin have on all of this? >> it had an enormous effect. one of the things you see when you read the transcripts, this part of the world was not of much interest to roosevelt at that point. he was interested in the u.n. that he was trying to set up, interested in the war in japan and one interesting moment where he said there's one polish city that this been polish before the war. they were arguing about the borders. maybe you should leave it in poland. he says to stalin, let's leave it in polllanpoland. stalin seems to agree. and thus to the fates of millions of people get decided and this is now in ukraine. but it was a kind of lack of interest, lack of focus in the last meetings of roosevelt and stalin. >> a seemingly crass question that i always ask historians when they're on the show. people do these books about topics that have been written by academics for a lo
to russia and deputy secretary of state. it's going to be coming out in mid december. it will be recorded to congress and i understand it will be very, very tough on the state department for not ramping up security which many people believe could be the real issue not what was said on sunday morning television. the white house is fighting for her. >> so andrea, i just am confused but maybe you can help straighten this out. i would think lindsey graham and senator mccain for sure -- i'm not sure about kelly ayotte, have been on sunday morning shows many, many, many times. and i'll leave it there and not even go to the point that maybe at times they might have said things that they, you know, weren't completely confirming. >> what they are suggesting is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. that's what lindsey graham suggested, and they were trying to mislead the american people. >> again, mike barnicle, i've asked this question before, did john mccain say that colin powell was unfit to continue as secretary of state after the information that he gave b
russia been here for 20 years. those are, quote. sick people that were planning to go ahead with this marathon even though they cancelled it people were furious that they were ever considering it. more in the next hour including someone who lost their home. guys back to you. >> dave briggs, thanks so much for that report. being at the heart of it. >> brian: knicks did played last night packed house. brooklyn put on on thursday. the knicks played unbelievable. the crowd seemed great. i was in dave and busters yesterday as well as the marriott. >> steve: because it was warm. >> brian: it was packed. they were happy for the distraction i believe because there were a lot of people there that didn't look like basketball fans. >> steve: needed something to cheer for and they got it. >> gretchen: now for your headlines. president obama ordering the military to send fuel to new york in the wake of hurricane sandy. gas shortages have sparked insanely long lines and left people panicked. gas will be rationed starting today at noon. people with license plates ending in odd number will
have a go? this could be the job for you. >> reporter: russia today carries a typical quote, the whole process of american elections is fundamentally anti-democratic. in kenya one named bullfight, the other romney. make no mistake, the world over see this election as hugely important to them. >> america is the center of the world. if america is better the whole world is better. >> reporter: does this affect business every day internationally? >> this is very important indeed, not just for the business but for markets and it is a matter of confidence. it is not on who wins but a clear decisive decision one way or the other. >> the u.s. plays a traditional role, which it is one of the biggest in the world. it could have to be rethought as to whether or not it is affordable. >> reporter: in europe one survey shows 75% of voters would choose obama. in germany, 92%. in israel, polls strongly favor romney who locally supported iran's nuclear facility. continuity and age is important to nations in transition. >> there are people worried about if the brother is going to run amuck. i'm not sure
are up 25%, up 40%, russia up 80%. last week we took steps towards a new defense partnership with united arab emirate that could be worth more than 6 billion pounds to british industry. i want us to go further still. when i look around the world, i see countries like germany using overseas business that works to drive new business. in brazil, for example, 1700 members of the german chamber. 1700 members of the u.s. chamber's. how many does the u.k. have? just 240. we need to do all whole lot better than that. i have asked steven green, our trade minister to work at home and overseas to increase the quantity and quality of services offered, could relate to the smaller companies seeking to establish themselves abroad for the first time. he will begin within 8 million pound pilot and 20 keep markets and go on to lead a transformation that will change the face of british trade overseas across the globe. there are valuable markets out there that just have not received the attention from government that they deserve. places like to wait, vietnam, algeria, indonesia, rocco. we need to do more t
considerably. as you can see, there is a lot of over russia there in recent years. i also want to focus on the total number of political appointees and appointments available to each president. these are the main categories. presidential appointment with consent at the set, about 800 people, they are at the top of the executive branch, these are constitutionally established offices of the united states. each one of them is created by a congressional statute. non-career senior executive service. it has about 8000 career people, but 10% of those means nonpolitical appointees. it is a bridge gaps between the top-level executive and the next layer is of mid-level management. the next category are level 1- 15, it means general schedule. these were created in 1953. republicans were so starved of getting offices, eisenhower did not approve of patronage and did not want anything to do with a, but the pressure from the republican party was so great that they brought patronage into the white house and created in schedules c positions lower at the bureaucracy. at that time, there were about 200 of
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